NEES News

Two NEES students write for DOE Newsletter; one story profiles NEES research

Two NEES students write for DOE Newsletter; one story profiles NEES research

Graduate students Timothy Plett of the University of California, Irvine, and Emily Sahadeo of the University of Maryland have become contributing writers for "Frontiers in Energy Research", a newsletter describing the reaserch taking place in the various Energy Frontier Research Centers that DOE funds.

 

Plett's article, "Nanowires' Growth Reveals Insights into Electrical Resistance" is about NEES PI Reginald Penner and his colleague Mya Le's research into reducing internal energy loss in batteries.

"All batteries lose energy because of internal resistance, which is why batteries get hot after long use. To make more efficient batteries, scientists are researching methods to lower internal resistance. Mya Le and her colleagues from the Energy Frontier Research Center Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (NEES) approached the challenge of internal resistance for the case of tiny electrodes, a key component for new, novel battery design. Understanding internal resistance could lead to "nano-batteries" that take advantage of nanoscale structures to improve electrical energy storage, lasting longer and delivering more energy than conventional technologies." Read more

Sahadeo's article, "The Secrets Such Structures May Hold: Zeolites and Metal-Organic Frameworks", covers work from two other EFRCs that are developing new catalysts and using nanoporous materials.

October 1, 2015


Prev   Next

Current Headlines

ChBE PhD Candidate Fudong Han Wins 2018 Dean's Doctoral Research Award

Breakthrough protonic fuel cell study published in Nature

Outstanding Microscopist and Teacher Honored with Fellowship

NEES legislative outreach highlighted in EFRC newsletter

Scientists Mix the Unmixable to Create 'Shocking' Nanoparticles

3D Li metal anode provides high energy and improved safety

UMD ARPA-E Innovations transitioning to commercial reality

Biofilm Made of Cellulose Nanofibers Offers Robust, Eco-friendly Materials for Emerging Applications

News Resources

Return to Newsroom

Search News

Archived News

Events Resources

Events Calendar